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222 East 6th Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Aves.) New York, NY 10003
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Sunday Jan 28 2018

Book presentation — The Ukrainian Night with author Marci Shore

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Meet author Marci Shore
who will present her book
THE UKRAINIAN NIGHT
An Intimate History of Revolution

(Yale University Press, 2018)

Sunday, January 28, 2018 at 2pm
The Ukrainian Museum
222 East 6th Street
(between 2nd Ave. & The Bowery)
New York, New York 10003
Admission: $10;
$5 members and students
Tickets online at Eventbrite
or at the door 1/2 hour before the event.
Books will be available for purchase and signing.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Marci Shore is associate professor of history at Yale University and award-winning author of Caviar and Ashes and The Taste of Ashes. She has spent much of her adult life in Central and Eastern Europe.

Four years ago, much of the world watched the unfolding revolution in Ukraine as an episode of geopolitical turmoil, but to the parents and children, activists and soldiers, Jews and Christians living there that winter, it was an existential transformation. The classes they took, the jobs they had, the routines they relied upon were all turned upside down. Instead, there was a blurring of day and night, the sudden disappearance of fear, and the need to make stark choices. In the book, Shore tells the stories of individuals living through the Ukrainian revolution, and explores powerful questions about political upheaval. What pushes people to lose their fear and take to the streets? What brings parents and children together and what splits generations apart? Under what circumstances does fear disappear? What is worth dying for?

Dr. Shore will touch on these topics:
• Paul Manafort’s role in Ukraine with Viktor Yanukovych
• the fragility of liberalism and what Eastern Europeans understand that Americans don’t
• once truth is destroyed, anything is possible—lessons from Ukraine and the Soviet Union

“As a guide, an historian, and a storyteller, Shore shows us the complex choices faced by the Ukrainians by artfully interweaving their personal experiences with the intellectual, social, and political history of the region.”—Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Gulag: A History

THE UKRAINIAN NIGHT by Marci Shore

On November 21, 2013, Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych declined to sign an association agreement with the European Union, unexpectedly reversing the course of his own foreign policy. That evening a 32-year-old Afghan-Ukrainian journalist posted a note on his Facebook page: “Come on, let’s get serious. Who is ready to go out to the Maidan”—Kiev’s central square—“by midnight tonight? ‘Likes’ don’t count.”

“Likes don’t count” became the beginning of a revolution. Hundreds of thousands came out to the streets. Three months later, Kiev was burning. Far above the flaming barricades, on the rooftop of a high-rise hotel, government snipers fired downwards. Bodies fell, framed by black smoke.

In the days that followed the massacre, president Yanukovych fled to Russia, Russian president Vladimir Putin annexed Crimea, and separatists encouraged by the Kremlin started a war in eastern Ukraine—a war that threatens to unravel the European order and that has not ended.

The Maidan proved to be the most existentially transformative moment in Eastern Europe since 1989. It illuminated questions both particular and universal: Has twenty-first century oligarchy made democracy impossible? What is the meaning of revolution in a postmodern age? In The Ukrainian Night: An Intimate History of Revolution (Yale University Press, January 9, 2018), award-winning historian Marci Shore gives us a completely new way of looking at the events of the Maidan. Shore shows us revolution not as geopolitics, but as lived experience. She tells the stories of individuals—parents and children, activists and soldiers, Jews and Christians, speakers of Russian, Ukrainian, and many other languages. Through their personal accounts, Shore explores powerful questions about revolution: What is worth dying for? What brings parents and children together and what splits generations apart? Under what circumstances does fear disappear? And more. In this lyrical and intimate book, Shore evokes the human face of the Ukrainian Revolution. She gently sets her portraits of individual revolutionaries against the past as they understand it—and the future as they hope to make it.

ADVANCE PRAISE

“An excellent guide to understanding the Maidan Revolution in Ukraine, and its consequences. Shore has deep knowledge of the region, its history, and its current torment, and offers a lucid evaluation of the complicated evolution of Eastern Europe, which faces a dangerous situation. Her book is well written and honestly and deeply documented through direct and acute observations of facts on the ground.”—Norman Manea, Francis Flournoy Professor of European Studies and Writer in Residence, Bard College

“Marci Shore, one of the most original American historians today, conjures up the Maidan, the first truly postmodern revolution, with lively scenes and invocations of the layers of a complex past. Her book preserves the memory of this historical moment, which has a unique significance for our political future.” —Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Albert Guerard Professor in Literature, Stanford University

“Shore has the rare capacity to listen to hundreds of voices and turn them into both story and history—the finest possible achievement for any writer. In this book, she brings to life the protests and revolution in Ukraine from 2013-2014 by pairing personal anecdotes with political and historical analysis, showing readers how violence can affect one’s own friends and acquaintances, inspiring them to start a revolution.”—Slavenka Drakulic, author of How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

“The best way to make sense of a revolution unfolding in front of your eyes is to fall in love with it. This is exactly what Marci Shore does in this insightful, moving, and beautifully written reflection on the Ukrainian Maidan.”—Ivan Krastev, Chairman, Center for Liberal Strategies, Sofia, Bulgaria

“This remarkable book gives you a sense of the Euromaidan in Kiev as lived experience, seen through the eyes of a host of very different participants. Shore brilliantly captures the contingency, uncertainty, and chaos that was transmuted into the remarkable, seemingly transcendent solidarity of the Maidan’s unified resistance to a corrupt and cruel regime.” —Charles Taylor, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, McGill University

“Marci Shore shows us the history of the Ukrainian revolution set against the backdrop of ideas lived by concrete people. This professional historian does not hesitate to transcend the boundaries of her discipline by writing about herself, befriending her subjects, and openly identifying with the ideas she writes about. The empathetic criticism she practices makes for an excellent read and encourages engagement on the part of the reader.”—Slawomir Sierakowski, Krytyka Polityczna, Institute for Advanced Study in Warsaw.

http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/

Saturday Feb 10 2018

BOHDAN BOYCHUK (1927-2017) IN LIFE AND POETRY

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BOHDAN BOYCHUK (1927-2017) IN LIFE AND POETRY
Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 7 p.m.

Admission: $10
(includes gallery access, light reception)
Tickets available at the door one hour before the event.
The Ukrainian Museum
222 East 6th Street
(between 2nd Avenue & The Bowery)
New York, New York 10003
212.228.0110

Remembering the poet, writer, literary critic and the founding member of the New York Group on the first anniversary of his passing.

STASH LUCZKIW
ASKOLD MELNYCZUK
DZVINIA ORLOWSKY
MARIA REWAKOWICZ

will share their personal recollections of the poet and commemorate his life through readings of his poetry, as well as excerpts from their own works.


Stash Luczkiw is a poet, novelist, translator and journalist. He works as the editor of Longitude, an English-language magazine of international affairs published in Rome, Italy. His most recent book of poems is Vineworks, and he has also co-written with Jonathan Alpeyrie The Shattered Lens: a War Photographer’s True Story of Captivity and Survival in Syria. Born in New York City, he now lives in Italy.

Askold Melnyczuk's first novel, What Is Told, was a New York Times Notable Book.  His second, The Ambassador of the Dead, was selected as one of the Best Books of the Year by the LA Times. The House of Widows was chosen by the American Libraries Association’s Booklist as an Editor’s Choice.  The recipient of a three-year Lila Wallace Reader’s Digest Writer’s Grant, he’s also received the McGinnis Prize in Fiction and the Magid Prize from PEN for his work as founding editor of Agni.  In 2011 the Association of Writing Programs (AWP) honored him with its George Garret Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature.  His fiction has been translated into German, Russian, Ukrainian, and Polish. He co-edited From Three Worlds: The New Writing from Ukraine and has published both translations from Ukrainian (of Bohdan Boychuk, Marjana Savka, Oksana Zabuzhko, Yuri Vynnychuk, Ivan Drach and Mykola Rudenko) and an essay on translation in Words Without Borders. Currently Director of the MFA Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston, he has taught in the Bennington Writing Seminars, as well as at Boston University and Harvard.  He is founding editor of Arrowsmith Press. His most recent novel, Smedley’s Secret Guide to World Literature, was published in May, 2016.

Poet and translator Dzvinia Orlowsky is the author of five collections of poetry published by Carnegie Mellon University Press including A Handful of Bees, reprinted in 2009 as a Carnegie Mellon Classic Contemporary; Convertible Night, Flurry of Stones, recipient of a 2010 Sheila Motton Book Award; and her most recent, Silvertone, for which she was named Ohio Poetry Day Association’s 2014 Co-Poet of the Year. Her translation from Ukrainian of Alexander Dovzhenko’s novella, The Enchanted Desna, was published by House Between Water in 2006; and Jeff Friedman’s and her co-translation of Memorials by Polish Poet Mieczyslaw Jastrun was published by Dialogos in 2014. She is a Founding Editor of Four Way Books, the Poetry Editor for Translation for Solstice Literary Magazine:  A Magazine of Diverse Voices, a recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a Massachusetts Cultural Council poetry grant, and co-recipient with Friedman of a 2016 National Endowment for the Arts Literature Translation Grant. She teaches poetry at the Solstice Low-Residency MFA Program in Creative Writing of Pine Manor College and at Providence College. Her new poetry collection, Bad Harvest, is forthcoming from Carnegie Mellon in fall, 2018.

Poet and literary scholar Maria G. Rewakowicz is the author of four poetry collections and two anthologies in Ukrainian, as well as two English-language monographs in literary criticism. Her book Literature, Exile, Alterity: The New York Group of Ukrainian Poets, published by the Academic Studies Press in 2014, has just been reissued in paperback. Her most recent book of criticism Ukraine’s Quest for Identity: Embracing Cultural Hybridity in Literary Imagination, 1991-2011 came out in October, 2017. She teaches Ukrainian literature at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. The paperback edition of Literature, Exile, Alterity: The New York Group of Ukrainian Poets (2014, Academic Studies Press) will be available for purchase at the event.

 


http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/

Sunday November 12 2017
thru Sep 23

Exhibition — Timeless Treasures: Recently Acquired Folk Costumes and Textiles

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Timeless Treasures, a new collection on display for the first time, features more than 80 exquisite items added to The Ukrainian Museum's extensive collection of textile art: 20 complete folk costumes from various regions of Ukraine, intricately woven wrap skirts, richly embroidered shirts and ritual cloths, elaborate headdresses, accessories, outerwear, and much more drawn from a recent major acquisition of mid-19th to mid-20th century costumes and textiles.

More about Timeless Treasures: www.ukrainianmuseum.org/ex_170917_borzemsky.html


The Ukrainian Museum
222 East Sixth Street
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
New York, New York 10003
Tel: 212.228.0110
Wed. thru Sun. 11:30am-5pm


http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/

Saturday Nov 18 2017
thru Mar 25

Exhibition — .RAW | Ukraine on the Front Lines

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Supported by the Ministry of Information Policy of Ukraine, the exhibition .RAW | Ukraine on the Front Lines presents a documentary photo chronicle of the transformation of the Ukrainian Army and Ukrainian society since the start of the war in Eastern Ukraine in 2014. Visitors have a chance to view photographs by eyewitnesses and participants of the horrific events that changed Ukraine and the world forever. The exhibition showcases the work of 33 leading photojournalists and curators from Ukraine, the U.S. and other countries, including Aleksandr Glyadyelov, Brendan Hoffman, Joseph Sywenkyj, Aleõander Vasukovich, and others. The exhibition has become an international platform for Ukraine’s informational and cultural diplomacy. It will be on display through March 25, 2018.


The Ukrainian Museum
222 East Sixth Street
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
New York, New York 10003
Tel: 212.228.0110
Wed. thru Sun. 11:30am-5pm


http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/

Sunday September 17 2017
thru Feb 25

Exhibition — Prints and Paintings by Bohdan Borzemsky: Retrospective

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The exhibition Prints and Paintings by Bohdan Borzemsky: Retrospective at The Ukrainian Museum celebrates Bohdan Borzemsky (b. 1923 in Kolomiya, Ukraine) by showcasing a selection of works that represent the various styles and aspects developed by the artist during his long and prolific creative career.

More about Borzemsky: www.ukrainianmuseum.org/ex_170917_borzemsky.html


The Ukrainian Museum
222 East Sixth Street
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
New York, New York 10003
Tel: 212.228.0110
Wed. thru Sun. 11:30am-5pm


http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/

Saturday July 1 2017
thru Sep 23

Exhibition — Traditional Ukrainian Folk Headdresses

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Headdresses are an important part of Ukrainian folk costumes. Their development, establishment, and use were based on practical, functional, customary needs and requirements, esthetic tastes, and hallowed beliefs in their magical power to safeguard against evil. The headdresses in this exhibition, most of them on loan from the collection of Vasyl Nayda, are from the Borshchiv and Zalishchyky districts of western Podillia. Traditional Ukrainian Folk Headdresses: The Borshchiv and Zalishchyky Districts is comprised of wedding wreaths for brides and bridesmaids, men's headwear, married women's headwraps, as well as accessories and decorative items such as woven sashes and gerdany (seed beaded strips).


The Ukrainian Museum
222 East Sixth Street
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
New York, New York 10003
Tel: 212.228.0110
Wed. thru Sun. 11:30am-5pm


http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/
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