THE UKRAINIAN MUSEUM
222 East 6th Street, New York, NY 10003 · 212-228-0110 · www.ukrainianmuseum.org


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March 20, 2021
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VIRTUAL PYSANKA WORKSHOPS

Join our workshops via Zoom / make your Easter eggs at home!


 

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PYSANKY – UKRAINIAN EASTER EGG DECORATION WORKSHOPS

Participants will have the opportunity to learn the art of making pysanky – Ukrainian Easter eggs. Dyes, beeswax and a stylus are used to decorate the eggs with traditional Ukrainian designs. Fill your Easter basket with beautiful pysanky made by your own hand!

We have scheduled a series of pysanka (Easter egg) workshops that will be conducted via Zoom. Instructors will demonstrate from the Museum, while students at home will follow the steps as they make their own pysanka.

Online registration is required! Register now on Eventbrite. The fee is $10 per person; $9 for Museum members.

Saturday, March 27, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. or 1:30–3 p.m.
Traditional Hutsul-style pysanka
Instructor: Olia Rudyk

Saturday, March 27, 3:30–4:30 p.m.
Traditional Lemko-style pysanka
Instructor: Hanya Krill

Sunday, March 28, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. or 1:30–3 p.m.
Traditional Hutsul-style pysanka
Instructor: Emily Robbins

Sunday, March 28, 3:30–4:30 p.m.
Traditional Lemko-style pysanka
Instructor: Hanya Krill

Because the classes are conducted remotely, students must procure all of the necessary tools and materials for use at home. These workshops are recommended for ages 12+ due to the use of candles and aniline dyes (such as the white packets sold in the shop and the ones included in "Luba's Kit" (see the onlne shop images below). For younger children please use food coloring dyes, and do not use candles to melt the wax off the eggs (other options will be suggested during the class).

Traditional Hutsul pysanka using a kistka
Materials:

  1. plastic tablecloth to protect the furniture
  2. paper towels
  3. room temperature raw egg
  4. pencil
  5. beeswax
  6. kistka (the tool for writing with the wax)
  7. prepared dyes in jars: yellow, orange, red, black
  8. spoon for dipping the egg into the dyes
  9. candle in a candleholder

Lemko style pysanka using a straight pin or small nail head
Materials:

  1. plastic tablecloth to protect the furniture
  2. paper towels
  3. room temperature raw egg(s)
  4. beeswax
  5. a melting pot for the wax (we will send suggestions with options)
  6. straight-pin pushed into the eraser end of a pencil or chop stick, or a nail with a very small nailhead
  7. prepared dyes in jars: yellow, orange, red, black
  8. spoon for dipping the egg into the dyes
  9. candle in a candleholder

We will follow up with an email containing links to a video and documents that registrants should watch and/or read before attending the workshop. Students will also receive an invitation link to the scheduled workshop on www.zoom.com, which you may watch on your computer or on your smartphone at home.

You may order the kistka, wax, and dyes from our online shop (http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/shop/).

We hope you'll be interested in joining us for these fun activities!

Please share the link to this email:
http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/enews/2021/2103/210320pysankawksponline.html


SHOP ONLINE


Shop online for pysanka dyes, beeswax and tools, books, cards, posters, etc. Browse through all the categories for great gift ideas!

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Send an email to giftshop@ukrainianmuseum.org or call the shop at 212-228-0110 to order the one-of-a-kind items not found in the online store: traditional hand-embroidered textiles including Easter basket covers, Easter eggs, instructional books and DVD, egg decorating supplies, hand-painted silk scarves with Easter egg motifs, exquisitely decorated goose, hen, and quail eggs (each a unique masterpiece!), miniature hand-embroidered pillows, and so much more!


CURRENT EXHIBITIONS


The Impact of Modernity: Late 19th and Early 20th Century Ukrainian Art. Major Gift from Dr. Jurij Rybak and Anna Ortynskyj
Ongoing
Curated by Myroslav Shkandrij, Professor of Slavic Studies at the University of Manitoba, the exhibition brings together previously unseen works by artists of different backgrounds who all originally came from Ukraine. It offers viewers the opportunity to see some of the greatest artists of the last two centuries and simultaneously to explore the unique homeland-diaspora relationship that their creativity represents.

More about The Impact of Modernity


HOLODOMOR: A REMEMBRANCE. Artworks by Lydia Bodnar-Balahutrak
Ongoing
The Ukrainian Museum is pleased to host the virtual exhibition Holodomor: A Remembrance in commemoration of the 87-year anniversary of the Holodomor Famine-Genocide, which occurred in Ukraine in 1932–33. It is a visual arts presentation featuring the works of Ukrainian-American artist Lydia Bodnar-Balahutrak.


A Conversation. Five Years of War in the Donbas
Ongoing
A Conversation, is an installation and art performance by legendary Ukrainian artist Vlodko Kaufman with the assistance of fellow Ukrainian artist Natalka Shymin, mounted in cooperation with the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University. It is a candid and provocative, yet subtle, treatment of the everyday responses of Ukrainians to war in their homeland and is a reminder to those outside of Ukraine that it endures.


Faces of the Crimean Tatar Deportation 75 Years Later
Ongoing
On the morning of May 18, 1944, the Soviet government initiated a special operation in Crimea: the deportation of Crimean Tatars (Kirimli) to the Urals and Central Asia. Zarema Yaliboylu's exhibition, Faces of the Crimean Tatar Deportation 75 Years Later, reveals this crime perpetrated by the Stalinist regime against the Kirimli through portraits and stories of ordinary people who survived the deportation and managed at last to return to Crimea. The people in these photos are living witnesses to Soviet crimes against humanity.

More about Faces of the Crimean Tatar Deportation 75 Years Later

 


Alexander Archipenko: Selected works
Ongoing
Influenced by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, Alexander Archipenko developed his own avant-garde sculptural style experimenting with convex/concave forms, volume/space transference, and inventing sculpto-painting. By 1920, Archipenko had become one of the most important sculptors of the era.


Visitor information:
http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/visit.html

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The Ukrainian Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
Support the Museum by making an online donation today!
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The Ukrainian Museum's exhibitions and programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.


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The Museum's educational and traditional arts programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.


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The Ukrainian Museum is a member of the American Alliance of Museums


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