T h e   U k r a i n i a n    M u s e u m
222 East 6th Street (bet. 2nd and 3rd Aves.) New York, NY 10003 212-228-0110
Wed. thru Sun. 11:30 am - 5:00 pm e-mail: info@UkrainianMuseum.org

 

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News archive
 ·  NEWS MAIN PAGE
 ·  NYC exhibition explores works of woodcut artist Hnizdovsky. By Ula Ilnytzky (Associated Press) (Mar 29, 2016)
 ·  NYC Exhibition Explores Works of Woodcut Artist Hnizdovsky (The New York Times/Associated Press) (Mar 29, 2016)
 ·  Exhibition: Jacques Hnizdovsky: Content and Style. Evolving Perspectives (Feb 26, 2016)
 ·  The Ukrainian Museum's Exhibition Catalogue Receives Prestigious College Art Association's 2016 Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums (Feb 8, 2016)
 ·  Exhibition: The Ukrainian Diaspora: Women Artists 1908–2015 (Oct 18, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: Sixty Years an Artist: A Retrospective Exhibition of Works by Zenowij Onyshkewych (Sept 27, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: Petrykivka: The Soul of Ukraine, Ukraines UNESCO Treasure (May 4, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: The Tales and Myths of Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern (March 15, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: PYSANKA: Guardian of Life (March 13, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: Staging the Ukrainian Avant-Garde of the 1910s and 1920s (January 28, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: Yara at 25: Looking Back/Moving Forward (January 20, 2015)
 ·  Exhibition: We Are All Ukraine. Art by Waldemart Klyuzko (May 10, 2014)
 ·  Exhibition: TARAS SHEVCHENKO: POET, PAINTER, ICON (1814-1861) (April 16, 2014)
 ·  Exhibition: In Shevchenko's Land (March 28, 2014)
 ·  Exhibition: PROPAGANDA AND SLOGANS: The Political Poster in Soviet Ukraine, 1919-1921 (October 25, 2013)
 ·  Two Holodomor Exhibitions: Give Up Your Daily Bread and Evocations, works by Lydia Bodnar-Balahutrak (October 10, 2013)
 ·  Professor Renata Holod elected Board president. Annual Meeting recap, July 22, 2013
 ·  Exhibition Out of Tradition: Contemporary Decorative and Applied Art, April 28–September 29, 2013 (April 1, 2013)
 ·  Kinofest NYC 2013 Festival Lineup and Film Premieres Announced. Fourth annual festival takes place April 4–7 (March 1, 2013)
 ·  Ron Kostyniuk: Art As Nature Analogue, Constructivist sculpture exhibition (October 21, 2012)
 ·  A Singular Vision: Ilona Sochynsky, Retrospective of Painting, an exhibition of contemporary art (May 13, 2012)
 ·  Kinofest: Film Festival of the Best New Cinema From Ukraine and Other Post-Soviet Nations (5/3/12, Huffington Post)
 ·  Ukrainian Film Festival, Kinofest NYC, Plumbs the Post-Soviet Era (5/2/12, New York Times)
 ·  East Village Film Festival Highlights Ukrainian Culture (5/2/12, DNA Info)
 ·  NYU East Village Reporter: Ukrainian Museum Celebrates Easter (4/9/12)
 ·  See the Museum's pysanky on the "Eggstravaganza" episode on ABC's "The Chew" (4/5/12)
 ·  New York Times Video: Dye-Hards Decorate Easter Eggs at Ukrainian Museum (3/30/12)
 ·  NYC-ARTS features The Ukrainian Museum's exhibition Borys Kosarev: Modernist Kharkiv, 1915-1931 (2/23/12)
 ·  Ukrainian Kilims: Journey of a Heritage at The Ukrainian Museum (1/30/2012)
 ·  Antiques on Camera and Behind Every Door. UKRAINIAN WEAVINGS (1/26/12, NY Times)
 ·  First Ever Exhibition of Kosarev Works Presented at The Ukrainian Museum (12/3/2011)
 ·  During Time of Celebration and Uncertainty, Ukrainian Museum Kicks Off Fall Season (9/26/11, NY Times)
 ·  Museum welcomes new president (8/1/11)
 ·  Jewelry Designer Anna Sheffield Shops at the Ukrainian Museum (6/10/11, Racked)
 ·  New exhibition The Worlds of Sviatoslav Hordynsky (5/13/11)
 ·  New exhibition Inside Chornobyl (4/17/11)
 ·  New exhibition Opanas Zalyvakha: The Road to Truth (1/23/11)
 ·  A festive opening for Invitation to a Wedding (12/6/10)
 ·  - - -: 𳿻 (9/13/10)
 ·  (6/8/10)
 ·  An Opening Weekend fit for a Hetman (5/1/10)
 ·  Kinofest NYC (3/3/10)
 ·  A Visit to the Ukraine via New York (2/28/10)
 ·  Visit from President Yushchenko (9/22/09)
 ·  Annual Meeting (6/13/09)
 ·  Spring Gala (4/1/09)
 ·  Art Review (1/24-25/09, International Herald Tribune
 ·  Showman Who Dabbled in Many Modernisms by Ken Johnson (12/26/08, NY Times; review of the David Burliuk exhibition)
 ·  Vessel of Life [Sosud Zhizni] (6/21/07, Russian Bazaar)
 ·  Spring 2007 Newsletter (PDF)
 ·  Decorating eggs for Easter — Ukrainian style (4/6/07, ABC News)
 ·  The Art of Pysanky (4/5/07, TheStreet.com)
 ·  The Ukrainian Museum Hosts Minister Tarasiuk and High Ranking Diplomats (9/23/06)
 ·  Managing the Archaeological Heritage at the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesos (9/15/06)
 ·  TREE OF LIFE. By N.F. Karlins (2/21/06, ArtNet)
 ·  Morris Sato Studio Creates Innovative Installation for Alexander Archipenko Exhibition (3/27/05)
 ·  AUDIO - VOA report and interview with President of The Ukrainian Museum (time marker 10:35 for 5 min.)
 ·  Museum awarded IMLS grant (10/19/04)
 ·  Annual Meeting (June 2003)
 ·  Post WWII DP Camps (3/11/03)
 ·  Topping Out At The Ukrainian Museum's Top Project (12/8/02)
 ·  Government of Ukraine Extends Offer of Support to The Ukrainian Museum in New York City (3/11/02)
 ·  Building a dream: construction of the new Ukrainian Museum gets underway (2/3/02)
 ·  Who Built The Ukrainian Museum? (10/7/01)
 ·  Museum Signs Building Contract (8/2/01)
 ·  Annual Meeting of The Ukrainian Museum (June 2001)
 ·  Phone-A-Thon a Success at The Ukrainian Museum
 ·  Ukrainian Museum Receives $500,000 from Self Reliance NY Federal Credit Union
 ·  The Ukrainian Museum Receives Major Gift
 ·  The Ukrainian Museum's Malanka 2001
 ·  The Ukrainian Museum's ANNUAL MEETING 2000
 ·  Spring 2000 Newsletter
 ·  Steckiw Collection
 ·  To Preserve a Heritage
 ·  Bikathon for Building Fund
Newsletter on the Web


Media inquiries: it(a)ukrainianmuseum.org

 


Life Imitating Art: A Challenge!

image
Left: The Arnolfini Portrait (1432) by Jan Van Eyck. The National Gallery (London)
Right: Author unknown
Image source: Sad and Useless

A few weeks ago, the Getty Museum issued a challenge to its followers to recreate fine artworks using ordinary objects found at home. The results were stunningly funny and very creative.

We thought the project was a marvelous way to engage people with the works of art and at the same time have fun reinterpreting them. Because we know that our patrons are very creative and you all love to have fun, we decided to replicate the challenge for our audiences – but with a Ukrainian twist.

All of the artists in this sampling of 11 paintings (see below) from the Museum's permanent collection are of Ukrainian heritage. The artworks represent a range of styles and a variety of subject matter that we hope will be a source of inspiration as you endeavor to recreate the paintings using materials you have around the house. Below are a few suggestions based on the ones made by the Getty Museum.

– Use any objects from around the house, from a blank piece of paper to gowns to hats to potatoes.
– Enlist a pet.
– Make a face, strike a pose.
– Pay attention to lighting. Try to imagine where the light in the artwork is coming from, and orient your composition accordingly.
– Think abstractly. If you're having trouble re-creating an artwork's appearance, try focusing on either the shapes or the colors.
– Make it snackable! Edible art counts too: bread, cold cuts, fruit, etc.

Send a photograph of your setting to it@ukrainianmuseum.org. We will publish selected photos alongside the originals on the Museum's website and and in the comments on our Facebook page. Your name and contact information will NOT be published by the Museum.

Download high res images of the listed artworks here to get a closer look at your selected fine art painting.

#lifeimitatingartukrainian and #betweenartandquarantine

image
Left: Salvador Dalí. The Persistence of Memory. 1931. The Museum of Modern Art.
Right: Author unknown
Image source: Sad and Useless

View the images in these articles for hints and a good laugh!

Museum Asks People To Recreate Paintings With Stuff They Can Find at Home, Here Are The Results (March 31 2020)

Getty Artworks Recreated with Household Items by Creative Geniuses the World Over (March 30 2020)

People Recreate Works of Art With Objects Found at Home During Self-Quarantine (April 17, 2020)

Museums Ask People To Recreate Famous Paintings With Anything They Can Find At Home, Get 35 Hilarious Pics (April 3, 2020)


image

Opanas Zalyvakha (1925–2007)
Sounds
1995, oil on canvas
32 3/4 x 30 1/4 in.
Gift from the artist

 

Opanas Zalyvakha (1925–2007)

Ukrainian painter, graphic artist and dissident, born in the region of Kharkiv in Ukraine; died in Ivano-Frankivsk, Western Ukraine. His family moved to the Far East, escaping Holodomor, the famine of 1933. Studied in a few art colleges before he enrolled at the Leningrad Repin State Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in 1946. Expelled for ideological nonconformism, worked in Kaliningrad and Tiumen before moving back to Ukraine and settling in Ivano-Frankivsk. Active participant of the shistdesiatnyky movement (the generation of the sixties) and was arrested and sentenced to five years in Gulag for anti-Soviet propaganda. Worked as a draftsman after release from prison. Resumed art work in the 1980s and had solo shows in Ivano-Frankivsk, Lviv, Kyiv and abroad in London, Toronto, and New York City.


 

image

Ivan Yizhakevych (Izhakevych) (1864–1962)
The Flute Player
n.d., oil on canvas on cardboard
16 x 12 1/2 in.
Gift from Dr. Volodymyr Pushkar
in memory of his wife Stefania Pushkar

 

 

Ivan Yizhakevych (Izhakevych) (1864–1962)

Ukrainian painter and graphic artist, born in the village of Vyshnopil in the Kyiv region; died in Kyiv. Studied art first in a School of Icon Painting at the Kyiv-Pechersk Lavra (1876-1882), then privately with the painter Mykola Murashko (1882-1884). Afterwards, studied at the St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts where he remained until 1888. Became a well-known illustrator, working for many journals, including Nyva with which he collaborated until 1917. From 1905 to 1906 headed the Drawing School at the Kyiv-Pechersk Lavra. Worked in many styles and genres, from book illustrations to murals, also painted landscapes and portraits. His works are in many museum collections in Ukraine, his best work is included in the Taras Shevchenko National Museum.


 

image

Ivan Yizhakevych (Izhakevych) (1864–1962)
Sharing Bagels
n.d., tempera on cardboard
10 1/4 x 26 in.
Gift from Dr. Volodymyr Pushkar
in memory of his wife Stefania Pushkar

 

 

Ivan Yizhakevych (Izhakevych) (1864–1962)

Ukrainian painter and graphic artist, born in the village of Vyshnopil in the Kyiv region; died in Kyiv. Studied art first in a School of Icon Painting at the Kyiv-Pechersk Lavra (1876-1882), then privately with the painter Mykola Murashko (1882-1884). Afterwards, studied at the St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts where he remained until 1888. Became a well-known illustrator, working for many journals, including Nyva with which he collaborated until 1917. From 1905 to 1906 headed the Drawing School at the Kyiv-Pechersk Lavra. Worked in many styles and genres, from book illustrations to murals, also painted landscapes and portraits. His works are in many museum collections in Ukraine, his best work is included in the Taras Shevchenko National Museum.


 

image

Ivan Trusz (1869–1941)
Tatar
1909, oil on cardboard
8 x 10 in.
Gift from Lubomyra Pezansky

 

 

Ivan Trusz (Trush) (1869–1941)

Ukrainian painter-impressionist, art critic and activist in Ukrainian artistic circles of Galicia (Western Ukraine). Born in the village of Vysotsko in the Lviv region; died in Lviv. Studied art at the Krakow School of Visual Arts (1891–1897) under Leon Wyczółkowski and Jan Stanisławski, and later in Vienna (1894) and Munich (1897). Since 1898 lived in Lviv, where he befriended Ivan Franko and worked for the Shevchenko Scientific Society. Traveled widely in Ukraine and abroad. Known mainly for his landscapes and original use of color. Author of many portraits and genre paintings. His first solo exhibition took place in Lviv in 1899. Since then participated in many solo and group shows in Lviv, Kyiv, Poltava, Krakow, Poznan, Warsaw, as well as in London, Vienna and Sofia. His posthumous retrospective exhibit took place in Lviv in 1941. His artworks can be found at the National Museum in Lviv and at the Memorial Museum established in his former residence in Lviv.


 

image

Oleksa Novakivsky (1872–1935)
Woman with Roses
n.d., oil on canvas on wood
44 3/4 x 32 in.
Gift from Bohdan and Oksana Rak

 

 

Oleksa Novakivsky (1872–1935)

Painter and educator, born in the village of Slobodo-Obodivka (now Nova Obodivka) in the Vinnytsia region of Ukraine; died in Lviv. Studied painting in Odesa (1888-1892) and at the Krakow Academy of Fine Arts, graduating in 1900 with a gold medal. Settled near Krakow and devoted himself to landscape painting. Exhibited widely since 1901. His first major solo exhibition took place in Krakow in 1911. Moved to Lviv, Western Ukraine in 1913 securing Metropolitan Andrei Sheptytsky's patronage. In 1923, he founded a private art school in Lviv, which he headed until his death. His art evolved from a naturalistic and impressionist style to become more symbolist and expressionist following World War I. His work is held in many museum and private collections in Ukraine, especially at the National Museum in Lviv. A memorial museum dedicated to him and his artworks opened in Lviv in 1972.


 

image

Petro Mehyk (1899–1992)
Still Life
1946, oil on canvas
32 x 26 in.
Gift from the Stadnychenko Family

 

 

Petro Mehyk (1899–1992)

Ukrainian graphic artist, painter, and teacher, born in the village of Boshkivtsi in the Bukovyna region; died in Philadelphia. Graduated from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts (1928). Taught drawing, three-dimensional modeling, and art history in the Applied Arts School and the School of Carpentry-Construction in Warsaw (1928–1944), and also taught at the University of Warsaw (1925-1939). One of the organizers of the Warsaw art group called "Spokii" [Peace] and participated in 13 of its exhibitions. After World War II lived in a DP camp from which he immigrated to the United States in 1949, settling in Philadelphia. Co-founded the Ukrainian Art Studio, where he lectured and became director. One of the founders and editors of the art journal "Notatky z mystetstva" (Notes on Art, 1963–1990). Known for his portraits, still lifes and landscapes. Exhibited in Germany, USA, Czech Republic and Ukraine. His artworks can be found in museums and private collections in Rome, Ukraine, and the United States.


 

image

Lubomyr Kuzma (1913–2004)
Still Life
1986, encaustic on cardboard
26 1/4 x 32 1/8 in.
Gift from Halyna Kuzma

 

 

Lubomyr Kuzma (1913–2004)

Painter and pedagogue, born in the village of Bile in the Lviv Region, Western Ukraine; died in Tannersville, NY. Attended Lviv Gymnasium and, at the same time, studied painting with Mykola Fediuk. Enrolled at the Lviv University where he studied biology and art, and then continued his art education at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland. After World War II spent a few years in a DP camp in Germany from where he immigrated to the United States in 1949, settling in New York. Had his own art school in New York (1956–1984) and headed the Association of Ukrainian Artists in America. Worked mainly in tempera and encaustic paint, creating still lifes, portraits, and figural compositions. Participated in many solo and group shows, exhibiting in the US, Germany, France, and Canada. Many of his paintings are in the art collection of Lviv National Museum.


 

image

Alexis Gritchenko (Hryshchenko) (1883–1977)
Woman Combing Her Hair
n.d., oil on board
32 1/2 x 24 1/4 in.
Zenon and Olena Feszczak Collection

 

 

Alexis Gritchenko (Hryshchenko) (1883–1977)

Studied philology and biology at the Universities of Kyiv, St. Petersburg and Moscow before turning to a Ukrainian painter and theorist. Born in Krolovets in the Chernihiv region of Ukraine; died in Vence, France. From 1908 to 1918 lived in Moscow where he studied painting and was introduced to the modern art movement. In 1911, visited Paris and became acquainted with A. Archipenko. In 1919, fled from Moscow first to Crimea, and then to Istanbul (Constantinople) where he produced works that would establish him in the art world of Paris. Arrived in Paris in 1921 and three years later settled in southern France for good. His artworks were exhibited in leading Paris galleries and salons, including the Salon d'Automne and the Tuileries. His art can be found in various museums and private collections in France, Canada, the United States and Ukraine.


 

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David Burliuk (1882–1967)
Farm Scene with Red Chicken
n.d., oil on canvas board
8 x 10 in.
Gift from Dr. Jurij Rybak and Anna Ortynskyj

 

 

David Burliuk (1882–1967)

Ukrainian artist born in Semyrotivka near the village of Riabushky, Sumy oblast, Ukraine; died on Long Island, NY. Known as the father of Ukrainian and Russian futurism. Studied at Kazan and Odesa art schools, as well as later at the Royal Academy in Munich and at Cormon's Academy in Paris. From 1906 through 1916 held a number of group exhibitions in Moscow, Kyiv, Kherson, and Odesa. Made a Futurist tour of Russia with Vladimir Mayakovsky and Vasilli Kamensky. His family resided in the Urals (1915–1917), Siberia (1818–1919), Japan (1920–1922) and the United States since 1922, where he published the journal "Color and Rhyme" (1936–1966). Besides Russia and Ukraine he exhibited in Germany, Japan, Canada, Australia and the US.


 

image

Emma Andijewska (b. 1931)
Two in a Gondola
1991, acrylic on paper
25 1/2 x 19 3/4 in.
Gift from the artist

 

 

Emma Andijewska (b. 1931)

Poet and self-taught painter, born in Donetsk, Ukraine, in the family of a chemist-inventor (father) and an agriculturalist (mother). During World War II her family moved to Germany. Better known as a poet and writer, associated with the New York Group of Poets, Andijewska turned to painting late in her life. Like her poetry, her artworks display affinity to the aesthetics of Surrealism. She is the author of over twenty collections of poetry, three novels, and many volumes of short fiction. For many years she worked as an announcer and editor of the Ukrainian Department of Radio Liberty in Munich, Germany, where she still lives and works.

Prof. Wolfgang Längsfeld described the figures in Andijewska's quirky paintings as "fabulous creatures" and "fingerling potatoes" (Alexandrowitsch, Prasdinikow Georgi and Längsfeld, Wolfgang. Andijewska Bilder. Munich, 1999).


 

image

Emma Andijewska (b. 1931)
Visiting Venice
1991, acrylic on paper
25 1/2 x 19 3/4 in.
Gift from the artist

 

 

Emma Andijewska (b. 1931)

Poet and self-taught painter, born in Donetsk, Ukraine, in the family of a chemist-inventor (father) and an agriculturalist (mother). During World War II her family moved to Germany. Better known as a poet and writer, associated with the New York Group of Poets, Andijewska turned to painting late in her life. Like her poetry, her artworks display affinity to the aesthetics of Surrealism. She is the author of over twenty collections of poetry, three novels, and many volumes of short fiction. For many years she worked as an announcer and editor of the Ukrainian Department of Radio Liberty in Munich, Germany, where she still lives and works.

Prof. Wolfgang Längsfeld described the figures in Andijewska's quirky paintings as "fabulous creatures" and "fingerling potatoes" (Alexandrowitsch, Prasdinikow Georgi and Längsfeld, Wolfgang. Andijewska Bilder. Munich, 1999).

 

 


COVID-19 update

New York (March 13, 2020)

Dear Patrons of The Ukrainian Museum!

Due to increased concerns about the spread of COVID-19, and in an effort to heed the policy recommendations and guidelines issued by public health officials with respect to containing the spread of COVID-19, The Ukrainian Museum is closing its galleries and discontinuing all programs starting Saturday, March 14, 2020.

The upcoming Folk Art Courses and Workshops are suspended effective immediately. Anyone wishing a refund for registration in the programs may contact the Museum at 212-228-0110.

These precautionary measures are in the interest of public safety. The Ukrainian Museum will continue to closely monitor the situation and recommendations of public health officials, and will post updates regarding the Museum's status via email, on our website, and social media.

Should you have any questions please call The Ukrainian Museum at (212) 228-0110.

Please follow the recommended safety and health guidelines to protect against COVID-19. Visit these websites for more information:

We greatly appreciate the loyalty and support of our visitors, members and friends, and thank you for your understanding as we work together to best serve our public and staff during this challenging time.

We hope to see you at The Ukrainian Museum soon!

The Ukrainian Museum Administration and Board of Trustees

 


About the Museum

The Ukrainian Museum acquires, preserves, and exhibits articles of artistic or historic significance to the rich cultural heritage of Ukrainian Americans; its collections include thousands of items of folk art, fine art, and archival material. At its founding in 1976 by the Ukrainian National Womens League of America, the Museum was hailed as one of the finest achievements of Americans of Ukrainian descent. Since then, and particularly since its move in 2005 to a new, state-of-the-art building in Manhattans vibrant East Village, it has become known as one of the most interesting and dynamic smaller museums in New York City. Each year, the Museum organizes several exhibitions, publishes bilingual (English/Ukrainian) catalogues, and presents a wide range of public and educational programs, including concerts, films, lectures, courses, workshops, and special events.

* * *

The Ukrainian Museum
222 East 6th Street (between Second and Third Avenues)
New York, NY 10003
T: 212.228.0110
F: 212.228.1947
info@ukrainianmuseum.org
www.ukrainianmuseum.org

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