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FILM PROGRAM 2011
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The Ukrainian Museum's film series and traditional arts programs are supported, in part, by public funds
from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.


November 12, 2011, 7 p.m.
Jajo's Secret

Directed by James Motluk
Canada, 2009, 110 minutes
Made for TV documentary
English

Wikipedia: The movie begins with the discovery by filmmaker Motluk of a parole certificate issued to his late grandfather, Elias, in 1918. Trying to uncover the truth about why the certificate was issued, he begins a journey that is chronicled in the film, first to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario and then to Ottawa. What he discovers is that the Canadian government created legislation known as The War Measures Act to arrest and intern thousands of Ukrainians whom they perceived as enemy aliens during the war. After the war, these prisoners were paroled and made to work as forced labour in many private Canadian companies on the railroad, in the mines and even building the national park system. Motluk traces his own grandfather to a camp located in the northern Ontario town of Kapuskasing. Until recently, the Canadian government tried to hide what had happened. During the production of the film, the government finally apologized to the Ukrainian community and agreed to pay restitution. The title refers to Motluk's grandfather whom he would call Jajo [(pronounced "Dzhiadzho"), which is a version of "dido," meaning "grandfather"].


October 23, 2011, 2 p.m.
Marusia

1938, 110 minutes
Directed by Leo Bulgakov Peters
Musical arrangements by Dr. Alexander Koshetz
Based on a Ukrainian folk tale by Mykhailo Starytsky
Ukrainian with English subtitles
Marusia's love is coveted by three potential suitors: her beloved Hryts, his friend Potap, and the sinister Khoma. Wouldn't you know, Khoma plots to chase the other two suitors away in order to keep Marusia for himself.


October 21, 2011, 7 p.m.
Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (Tini Zabutykh Predkiv)

Dovzhenko Film Studios, Ukraine, 1964, 99 minutes
Directed by Sergei Paradjanov
Writing by Ivan Chendej, Mikhaylo Kotsyubinsky, story Sergei Paradjanov
Music by Myroslav Skoryk
Starring Ivan Mykolaichuk, Larisa Kadochnikova, Tatyana Bestayeva
Ukrainian with English subtitles
Synopsis by Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University: In a Carpathian village, Ivanko falls in love with Marichka, the daughter of his father's killer. When tragedy befalls her, his grief lasts months; finally he rejoins the colorful life around him, marrying Palagna. She wants children but his mind stays on his lost love. To recapture his attention, Palagna tries sorcery, and in the process comes under the spell of the sorcerer, publicly humiliating Ivanko, who then fights the sorcerer. The lively rhythms of village life, the work and the holidays, the pageant and revelry of weddings and funerals, the change of seasons, and nature's beauty give proportion to Ivanko's tragedy. This is widely considered to be one of the most important films in Ukrainian cinema history which developed a cult following around the world. For four decades now, it has captivated the imagination of viewers and filmmakers alike.


October 2, 2011, 2 p.m.
Svatannia na Honcharivtsi (Matchmaking at Honcharivka)
Admission (includes gallery access): $5

Ukraine, 1958, 80 minutes
Directed by Ihor Zemhano
Music by Kyrylo Stetsenko
Ukrainian, with intertitles in English
In this musical comedy based on the original 1835 play by Hryhoriy Kvitka-Osnovyanenko, the beautiful Ulyana is being given away as a bride to the fool Stetsko, son of a wealthy landowner, but her heart belongs to the poor serf, Alex. Traditional customs and cheerful folk songs entertain viewers on this journey into the past. Presented in conjunction with the Museum's current exhibition Invitation to a Wedding: Ukrainian Wedding Textiles and Traditions.


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June 10, 2011, 7:30 p.m.
Prorvemos! (Stop Revolution!)
Admission (includes gallery access and reception): $15 adults, $10 members and seniors, $5 students

Ukraine, 2007, 96 minutes
Directed by Ivan Kravchyshyn
Ukrainian, some Russian, English subtitles

The twin shadows of the 1986 Chornobyl disaster and the Orange Revolution hang over Ivan Kravchyshyn's multi-story, many-layered drama Prorvemos! At its center is the relentless police investigation of former nuclear physicist ‒ and current prisoner ‒ Nestor Ivanovich Hreem, whose path seems to be criss-crossed with several athletes who made the dire mistake of offending Nestor's Mafioso brother, Doc. Doc, in turn, bears responsibility for once sending aid to Chornobyl victims through a ministry that he established, and foolishly encouraging Nestor's son to volunteer ‒ which promptly led to the young man's torturous death from radioactive fallout. These stories intersect in a society whose denizens fail to adhere to logic, individual liberties, or trustworthiness ‒ tendencies that make life nearly impossible for everyone, including Nestor. Presented in cooperation with the organizers of Kinofest NYC, New York's only Ukrainian and post-Soviet film festival. Damian Kolodiy will introduce the film.


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June 4, 2011 at 7:30 p.m., and
June 5, 2011, 2:00 p.m.
Three Stories of Galicia

Admission (includes gallery access and reception): $15 adults, $10 members and seniors, $5 students
June 4: meet the filmmakers. Introduction by Alexander Motyl
June 5: pre-recorded intro and comments by filmmakers
2010, 86 minutes
Documentary by Olha Onyshko and Sarah Farhat
English, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, with English subtitles

Trapped between Hitler and Stalin, at a time when events were changing the course of history, three people in Galicia had the courage to risk everything and do what was right, taking it upon themselves to preserve the dignity of the human spirit: a Ukrainian woman endured the theft of her children to save her country, a Jewish man's family chose to save the life of an enemy, a Polish priest risked everything to end the sectarian hatred that tore at his parish. When World War II erupted, Galicia was caught in the ruthless struggle between Hitler's Third Reich and Stalin's Red Army. In their quest to rule the world, those two empires made use of the ethnic jealousies among Ukrainians, Jews, and Poles, fueling some of modern history's worst ethnic conflicts. But in the midst of evil, where trust had lost its meaning and human life had no value, there were those who were willing to risk what little they had left to do what was right instead of what was easy.

Filmmaker Olha Onyshko is originally from Galicia in Western Ukraine, where she began her career as a broadcast journalist. After moving to the U.S. in 2002, she worked as a reporter for the Voice of America, obtained a Master of Fine Arts in Film and Electronic Media, and produced and directed several short films before completing Three Stories of Galicia.

Originally from Lebanon, Sarah Farhat obtained her degree in Film and Television in Beirut, where she produced and directed several short documentary and fiction films focused on women's issues and inter-religious dialogue. She moved to the U.S. in 2006 and, after teaching photography, video, and design at the American University in Washington, D.C., is now a multimedia producer at the World Bank.

More about the film: www.threestoriesofgalicia.com.


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May 20, 2011, 7:30 p.m.
Bilyi ptakh z chornoiu oznakoiu (White Bird with a Black Mark)
Admission (includes gallery access and reception): $15 adults, $10 members and seniors, $5 students

Ukraine, 1970, 97 minutes
Directed by Yurii Illienko
Written by Yurii Illienko and Ivan Mykolaichuk
Ukrainian, some Romanian and Russian, English subtitles
Color, digitally restored version of the original motion picture by Information Business Systems and Telecommunications, Kyiv, Ukraine. Produced by the Oleksander Dovzhenko Studio, Kyiv, Ukraine.

This dramatic, captivating story of the Dzvonar family, caught in the whirlwind of history, unfolds against the hypnotically beautiful backdrop of the Carpathian Mountains and echoes the fate of the Ukrainian people in the 20th century: oppressed, humiliated, and brutalized by foreign invaders. It features an impressive line-up of actors, including Ivan Mykolaichuk, Larysa Kadochnykova, Kostiantyn Stepankov, Bohdan Stupka, and Natalia Naum. Bilyi ptakh z chornoiu oznakoiu is Ukrainian filmmaking at its best, waiting to be discovered by Western viewers. Presented in conjunction with the Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University, whose founder, Professor Yuri Shevchuk, will introduce the film.


May 14, 2011, 4:30 and 8:00 p.m.
Svatannia na Honcharivtsi (Matchmaking at Honcharivka)
Admission (includes gallery access): $5

Ukraine, 1958, 80 minutes
Directed by Ihor Zemhano
Music by Kyrylo Stetsenko
Ukrainian, English subtitles
In this musical comedy based on the original 1835 play by Hryhoriy Kvitka-Osnovyanenko, the beautiful Ulyana is being given away as a bride to the fool Stetsko, son of a wealthy landowner, but her heart belongs to the poor serf, Alex. Traditional customs and cheerful folk songs entertain viewers on this journey into the past. Presented in conjunction with the Museum's current exhibition Invitation to a Wedding: Ukrainian Wedding Textiles and Traditions.


March 16–20, 2011
Kinofest NYC

The Ukrainian Museum is a founding sponsor of the independent film festival kinofestNYC.com, established in 2010.
View the complete Kinofest NYC 2011 program (PDF 2MB).


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Wednesday, March 16, 8 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: Millennium Film Workshop

I Am from Nowhere
Directed by Georg Misch
Slovak/English (w/Eng. subtitles)
Slovakia, 2002, 79 min.
When asked about his origins, Andy Warhol used to say "I am from nowhere." Nowhere is actually the tiny village Mikova in Slovakia where all of Warhol's ancestors lived. Novelist and political scientist Alexander Motyl (Who Killed Andrei Warhol, 2007) identifies him as Rusyn-Ukrainian, a common ethnicity in that region. Georg Misch's quirky, entertaining, and informative documentary investigates the fuss the media has made about Warhol's relatives who still live there, Warhol-related media fame, and Warhol's legendary "15 minutes of fame."


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Thursday, March 17, 7 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: The Ukrainian Museum

Torn from the Flag
Directed by Klaudia Kovac
Hungarian/English (w/Eng. subtitles)
USA, 2007, 96 min.
The behind-the-scenes political intrigue leading up to and following the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

The First Karaoke
Directed by Oleh Chorniy, Gena Khmaruk
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2005, 2 min.
The First Karaoke starts with joyous Soviet Ukrainians singing the praises of communist life and ends with a surprise kicker.


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Friday, March 18, 7 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: The Ukrainian Museum

Not Alone at Home
Directed by Olena Fetisova
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2009, 52 min.
A highly educated Ukrainian woman finds her life mission in adopting and caring for very ill abandoned children of various nationalities.

Molfar Nechay
Directed by Slava Feofilaktov
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2008, 35 min.
One of Carpathian Ukraines dying breed of herbal magicians and medicine men talks about casting spells, the contents of magic potions, and his ability to predict the future and influence weather.


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Friday, March 18, 9 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: Millennium Film Workshop

Three film shorts by award-winning director Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy:
Deafness
Ukrainian (w/Eng.subtitles)
Ukraine, 2010, 11 min.
A deaf/nonspeaking young man is questioned by a hulking policeman and his partner in their squad car.
Diagnosis
Ukrainian (w/Eng.subtitles)
Ukraine, 2009, 15 min.
Rampant drug addiction, AIDS and relationships among homeless Ukrainian youth who form their own community in abandoned buildings to survive. Best Short Film Berlin Film Festival 2009.
The Incident
Ukrainian (w/Eng.subtitles)
Ukraine, 2006, 20 min.
A man cant elude the madness of city life by moving to the bucolic Ukrainian countryside.

Mum Died Saturday in the Kitchen...
Directed by Maksym Vasyanovych
Ukrainian/Russian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2009, 52 min.
A classical conductor in Zhytomyr gives up the chance for a professional career in order to raise his family.


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Saturday, March 19, 5 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: The Ukrainian Museum

Women from Georgia (Kalebi sakrtvelodan)
Directed by Levan Koguashvili
Georgian/English (w/Eng. subtitles)
Georgia, 2009, 53 min.
The lives of women who have left their families to work in the U.S.

2033 Kilometers to the Eiffel Tower
Directed by Olesandra Khrebtova, Olesandr Balaban
Ukrainian (w/ Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2009, 35 min.
A documentary about a town in Polissia (Ukraine) that once had Europes longest narrow-gauge railway, now lost and derelict in the marches. How do people survive after the collapse of the regional economy when there is no work or money?


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Saturday, March 19, 8 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: The Ukrainian Museum

Disco and Atomic War (Disko ja tuumasoda)
Directed by Jaak Kilmi
Estonian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Estonia, 2010, 80 min.
A tongue-in-cheek documentary about growing up in the Estonian capital of Tallinn during the waning days of the Cold War. The filmmaker comically recounts how Estonians discovered the American series Dallas via television transmissions from Helsinki, Finland, and how the Communist leadership haplessly attempted to protect their citizens from the corrupting influence of televised capitalist decadence. A lot of wonderful chest-pounding Soviet government footage mixed with clips of ordinary Estonians jerry-rigging their TV antennas.

Radunytsia ()
Directed by Roman Bondarchuk
Ukrainian, Russian, Surzhyk (w/ Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2007, 15 min.
After the fall of the Soviet Union many families were separated by the new state boundaries. Kljusy is a unique village that rests on the borders of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The village is full of earthy, interesting, comical characters, many of whom have intermarried. Relatives often have to meet illegally. This is what happens on Radunytsia (All Saints Day) when family members who live in three different countries gather at cemeteries.

The First Karaoke
Directed by Oleh Chorniy, Gena Khmaruk
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2005, 2 min.
The First Karaoke starts with joyous Soviet Ukrainians singing the praises of communist life and ends with a surprise kicker.


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Sunday, March 20, 2 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: The Ukrainian Museum

Eleven film shorts and animations by Ukrainian filmmakers.
Answer for a Prayer (³ )
Directed by Maksym Bunitsky
Ukrainian (no subtitles)
Ukraine, 2009, 3 min.
A man condemned to death by the KGB prays for help and receives an Answer for a Prayer, based on a Shevchenko poem.
Long Walk Forever ( – )
Directed by Maksym Bunitsky
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2010, 17 min.
A Kurt Vonnegut-inspired Long Walk Forever, a soldier returns home unexpectedly to invite a bride-to-be for a fateful walk.
Believe (³)
Directed by Christina Danylov
No dialogue
Ukraine, 2010, 4 min.
Born-again Christians get immersion baptized in an icy lake.
No Comments ( )
Directed by Dar Dryuchenko
No dialogue
Ukraine, 2010, 3 min.
A popular Kyivan bridge draws couples to it and their love pledges.
Melancholy Colors (i )
Directed by Stanislav Leschenko
No dialogue
Ukraine, 2009, 7 min.
An upbeat little film in which a street performer magically adds waves of spectacular colors to otherwise black and gray surroundings.
Ama at Sea
Directed by Malia Cohen
Ukrainian (w/ Eng. subtitles)
USA, 2009, 20 min.
Dark, film-noirish couple in a destructive relationship.
Not Scared (H C)
Directed by Kateryna Naumenko
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2009, 13 min.
Teen siblings sell apples in their Ukrainian village in hopes of saving money to purchase a motorbike. They are bullied by local kids until a young motorcross championship racer befriends them and invites them into his life, including the racetrack.
Switchman (C)
Directed by Serhiy Siliava
No dialogue
Ukraine, 2009, 10 min.
A lonely train switchman living an isolated life in a hut along the tracks is given the chance to leave his routine-filled life behind. The switchman must choose between his dull yet comfortably predictable existence or the uncharted unknown.
The Bears Favor ( )
Directed by Zhenya Alyokin
Ukrainian (w/ Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2003
Animation, 10 min.
A bear and squirrel residing in the same tree team up to battle a blistering blizzard.
Wandering Between ( )
Directed by Anatoliy Lavrenishin
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2005
Animation, 10 min.
A boy searching for love gets lost in a world of fantasy.
Very Close ()
Directed by Mykyta Shulyahyn
Ukrainian (w/Eng. subtitles)
Ukraine, 2010, 17 min.
A campy, comic book inspired sci-fi short where the young hero must save the world from destruction.


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Sunday, March 20, 5 p.m.
Kinofest NYC
Venue: The Ukrainian Museum

Man with the Movie Camera [ ]
Directed by Dziga Vertov
Intertitles, silent
Ukraine, 1929
65 min.
This stunning work remains a perfect distillation of the sense of urban existence. Composed of footage from Kyiv, Moscow and Odesa, the film shows everyday people at work and at play, from dawn to dusk, interacting with the machinery of modern life. In the style of other city symphony films of the 1920s, events are arranged to simulate the passage of a single day through a deliberate sequencing of events. Produced by Dziga Vertov (Denis Arkadievich Kaufman) at the Pan-Ukrainian Committee of Cinema and Photography (VUFKU) in 1929, the film serves as a reminder that he is one of the greatest pioneer filmmakers.
Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, founder of the Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University, will introduce the film and lead the Q&A. Guest speaker Annette Michelson, Professor Emeritus at New York University and editor of a translation of Dziga Vertovs writings, will talk about the film and its production studio, VUFKU. Serhiy Trymbach, head of the National Filmmakers Union of Ukraine, will discuss the latest developments in the Ukrainian film industry.


March–April, 2011
PYSANKA: The Ukrainian Easter Egg

Screened with each adult pysanka workshop, during pysanka demonstrations by artists, and school pysanka workshops.
Directed by Slavko Nowytski
USA, 1976
Internationally acclaimed 14 minute film by Slavko Nowytski featuring pysanka artist Luba Perchyshyn. Artistically shows the decorating process of Ukrainian Easter Eggs while explaining historic and spiritual background.


2011

In conjunction with the exhibition Invitation to a Wedding: Ukrainian Wedding Textiles and Traditions, three monitors were hung in the galleries with the films Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (selected clip showing bathub and wedding ceremony scenes), Svatannia na Honcharivtsi (Matchmaking at Honcharivka) and, The Art of Baking and Decorating a Korovai: The Traditional Ukrainian Wedding Bread playing continuously.

Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (Tini Zabutykh Predkiv)
Dovzhenko Film Studios, Ukraine, 1964, 99 minutes
Directed by Sergei Paradjanov
Writing by Ivan Chendej, Mikhaylo Kotsyubinsky, story Sergei Paradjanov
Music by Myroslav Skoryk
Starring Ivan Mykolaichuk, Larisa Kadochnikova, Tatyana Bestayeva
Ukrainian with English subtitles
Synopsis by Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University: In a Carpathian village, Ivanko falls in love with Marichka, the daughter of his father's killer. When tragedy befalls her, his grief lasts months; finally he rejoins the colorful life around him, marrying Palagna. She wants children but his mind stays on his lost love. To recapture his attention, Palagna tries sorcery, and in the process comes under the spell of the sorcerer, publicly humiliating Ivanko, who then fights the sorcerer. The lively rhythms of village life, the work and the holidays, the pageant and revelry of weddings and funerals, the change of seasons, and nature's beauty give proportion to Ivanko's tragedy. This is widely considered to be one of the most important films in Ukrainian cinema history which developed a cult following around the world. For four decades now, it has captivated the imagination of viewers and filmmakers alike.

Svatannia na Honcharivtsi (Matchmaking at Honcharivka)
Ukraine, 1958, 80 minutes
Directed by Ihor Zemhano
Music by Kyrylo Stetsenko
Ukrainian, with intertitles in English
In this musical comedy based on the original 1835 play by Hryhoriy Kvitka-Osnovyanenko, the beautiful Ulyana is being given away as a bride to the fool Stetsko, son of a wealthy landowner, but her heart belongs to the poor serf, Alex. Traditional customs and cheerful folk songs entertain viewers on this journey into the past. Presented in conjunction with the Museum's current exhibition Invitation to a Wedding: Ukrainian Wedding Textiles and Traditions.

The Art of Baking and Decorating a Korovai: The Traditional Ukrainian Wedding Bread
Directed by Yurij Luhovy
USA, 2011, 30 min
English
Documentary with Lubow Wolynetz, curator of the Museum's folk art collection, and master baker Larysa Zielyk, who lead a workshop that tells the story of the Ukrainian wedding – the rituals, customs, and traditions – at the same time that it instructs participants in the creation of the korovai.


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