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Wed. thru Sun. 11:30 am - 5:00 pm e-mail: info@UkrainianMuseum.org



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FILM PROGRAM
| Current year | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 |

The Ukrainian Museum's film series and traditional arts programs are supported, in part, by public funds
from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.


December 11, 2014, 7 pm
"The Guide" (Povodyr)
(2014)

An American boy, Peter Shamrock, travels to Ukraine with his father, an American engineer, who is killed for obtaining secret documents about repressions, now hidden in Peter’s book. Peter and the blind minstrel (kobzar) Ivan Kocherga are thrown together by fate amidst the turbulent mid-30s Soviet Ukraine. Ivan does everything to help his young guide grow up and survive with a kind and clear soul that will not be hardened by what his eyes have seen, telling the boy elaborate stories that make him believe there can be a different reality from what he sees around him. The blind kobzar may see the world with greater clarity than those with perfect eyes. The director Oles Sanin will present the film. The audience will also have a chance to meet the star of the film, Anton Sviatoslav Greene, who plays Peter. This event is co-organized with Dr. Yuri Shevchuk of the Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University. Admission (incl. reception) is $15; $10 for members and seniors; $5 for students.


December 5, 2014, 7 pm
"The Dream" (Son), 1964

Director Volodymyr Denysenko’s interpretation of Taras Shevchenko’s satirical poem written in 1844 exposing Russian Tsarism as a ruthless and authoritarian regime, which led to Shevchenko’s arrest and 10-year exile. Introduction by Dr. Vitaly A. Chernetsky, University of Kansas. Admission (incl. reception) is $15; $10 for members and seniors; $5 for students.


November 14, 2014
"Matinee at the Museum": Naimychka (The Servant Woman) (1963, tragedy, musical)

Opera by M. Verykivsky based on T. Shevchenko’s eponymous poem. A young girl, seduced by a lancer, leaves her illegitimate son with a childless family. Vira Donska-Prysiazhniuk in lead role; vocals by Kyiv Opera soprano Lilia Lobanova. Ukrainian, 82 min. Introduction by Lubow Wolynetz, curator of folk art. Admission (incl. reception) is $15; $10 for members and seniors; $5 for students.


October 17, 2014
Taras Shevchenko (1951, Magicolor)

This biopic stars Serhiy Bondarchuk, who later directed the Academy Award-winning epic film War and Peace. Directed by Ihor Savchenko. Ukrainian (no subtitles). Introduction by Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, Columbia University. Admission (incl. reception) is $15; $10 for members and seniors; $5 for students.


October 16, 2014
"Two Days in Ilovaisk" (2014)

(Dva dni v Ilovaisku), Ukrainian, no subtitles

Meet the filmmaker RUSLAN HANUSHCHAK, War correspondent/photographer
Documentary footage from the front lines in Ilovaisk, a town in eastern Ukraine. Mr. Hanushchak will also show his interview with Serhii Nigoyan, recorded just a few days before Serhii’s death. Nigoyan was the first to perish on the Maidan in Kyiv, and is counted among the heroes remembered as the Heavenly Hundred.
NOTE: The interviews in the video footage are in Ukrainian and some Russian. The filmmaker’s presentation and Q&A after the screening will be conducted in Ukrainian, with some English translation.


October 10, 2014
"Matinee at the Museum": ENTHUSIASM (SYMPHONY OF THE DONBAS) (1930)

ENTHUSIASM is the first Ukrainian sound film. English subtitles!

Filmed in 1930 by the world–class master of the cinematic avant-garde Dziga Vertov. It became the first motion-picture in which real industrial and routine sounds served to create an independent musical image. The film was dedicated to the First Five Year Plan, glorified industrialization and collectivization as well as propagandized the fight against illiteracy and religion.

ENTHUSIASM was shot when the Ukrainization program was cut down. But the camera of cameraman Hans Zeitlin still captured many indications of it. The film named by Charlie Chaplin one of the most impressive sound symphonies was released in theaters on April 2, 1931. But shortly after was removed from distribution and forgotten. It was rediscovered only in 1960s due to the renewed interest to the Soviet avant-garde in the West.

Museum admission: $8 adults; $6 seniors and students; FREE for Museum members.


October 4, 2014
Naimychka (The Servant Woman) (1963, tragedy, musical)

Opera by M. Verykivsky based on T. Shevchenko’s eponymous poem. A young girl, seduced by a lancer, leaves her illegitimate son with a childless family. Vira Donska-Prysiazhniuk in lead role; vocals by Kyiv Opera soprano Lilia Lobanova. Ukrainian, 82 min. Introduction by Lubow Wolynetz, curator of folk art. Admission (incl. reception) is $15; $10 for members and seniors; $5 for students.


September 27, 2014
Taras Shevchenko (1926, silent)

The first Shevchenko biopic ever made. Director: Petro Chardynin, 1926, VUFKU, Ukraine, b&w. Silent; Rus/Eng intertitles. Music: Oleksandr Saratskyi, 2012. Introduction by Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, Columbia University. Admission (incl. reception) is $15; $10 for members and seniors; $5 for students.


June 5-25, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

A variety of films were screened at matinée hour (3 pm) for museum visitors free of additional charge. Documentaries highlighting history in the last century and the recent past, narrative films by the great Ukrainian director Alexander Dovzhenko commemorating the 120th anniversary of his birth, and a 1926 silent biopic "Taras Shevchenko" (1814-1861) celebrating the artist/poet's bicentennial, were screened during our afternoon shows.


June 25, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Taras Shevchenko
Directed by Petro Chardynin
Biography
1926, VUFKU, Ukraine, B&W
Silent; Rus/Eng intertitles, & Ukr
Music: Oleksandr Saratskyi, 2012

The first Ukrainian biopic and the first film about Shevchenko's life that determined the canons for visual representation of the poet's biography before the film release of the same name by Igor Savchenko in 1951. At the time, the 1926 original silent was one of the most expensive shoots in Ukrainian Soviet filmmaking: specialists in history, ethnography, literature criticism and etc. were involved for the first time during the preparation for filming. Vasil Krychevsky, the famous modernist artist, created the artistic film design; Sergiy Efremov was a consultant for the film; and Amvrosiy Buchma brilliantly played the role of Taras Shevchenko.

It is interesting that the first third of the film, "Little Taras," which was significantly influenced by Margarita Barska-Chardynina, Chardynin's wife, the founder of Soviet children's film genre, was shown as a separate children's film.

Although "Taras Shevchenko" was the greatest Ukrainian professional achievement of director Petr Chardynin, the critics gave it an ambiguous reception. The film was criticized for the absence of a firm context, a story that lacked cause-and-effect linkages, and made simply as a chronology of Shevchenko's life events. The film critics of 1920's were not prepared to appraise such and usual new film genre, which relies on memories and citations to develop the narrative.

Nevertheless, composed from a number of short novels illustrating Shevchenko's life as a young man, soldier, and poet, the film "Taras Shevchenko" was screened triumphantly in Ukraine and other countries, and it became the most successful film project of Ukraine in 1926.


June 20, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Farewell, America (Proshchay Ameryko!)
Directed by Alexander Dovzhenko
Soviet propaganda narrative
1949
70 mins.
Rus, Eng subtitles
Color

An unfinished film by Aleksandr Dovzhenko, the film is a political lampoon based on the book entitled "The Truth about US Diplomats," written in 1949 by the American writer Annabel Bukar. It purportedly "exposes" the underhanded actions of US Embassy personnel in Moscow at the onset of the Cold War. Dovzhenko managed to shoot only about half of the film, mainly the scenes that take place in the American Embassy.

Jonathan Rosenblum review:
Around 1950, after seeing his own ideas rejected time and again, the great Soviet director Alexander Dovzhenko undertook this grotesque piece of kitsch, which was inspired by the defection of U.S. journalist Annabelle Bucard after she discovered that the U.S. embassy in Moscow, where she worked, was a nest of spies. Dovzhenko's script went through countless drafts, and when Stalin terminated the project (for reasons that are still obscure), the director learned the news only when the electricity was abruptly shut off on the soundstage where he was working. The film was finally released in 1995, with commentary on the missing pieces and material about its arduous birth, and it's morbidly fascinating as an example of Stalinist filmmaking.


June 19, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Michurin
Directed by Alexander Dovzhenko
Biography
1949
Studio Mosfilm
99 min.
Rus, Eng subtitles
Color

Michurin is a 1948 Soviet film directed by Alexander Dovzhenko about the life of a Russian scientist Ivan Vladimirovich Michurin (1855-1935), known for his work in plant hybridization. The film is based on Dovzhenko's play "Life in Bloom."

Exerpts (with modifications) from a review in The New York Times, May 9, 1949:

Dovzenko, a deep admirer of Michurin, follows the party line in this film, stressing his hero's common man qualities, his "discovery" by Lenin, and the accolades accorded him by Stalin and Kalinin. Michurin's research and scientific breakthroughs achieve renown even in the West. But his love of Russia, even Czarist Russia, is illustrated in the opening sequence when he is shown turning down an offer made by two Americans-who speak English, incidentally-to transfer his nursery and operations to this country.

Scientically the film accentuates Michurin's position as a follower, not an opponent of, Darwin. In developing his theory that acquired characteristics can be transmitted, Michurin is shown in the process of growing many hybrids including a cross between an apple and a pear. The story is climaxed when Kozlov, the town where he nurtured his strange crops for many years, is renamed Michurinsk in his honor. But his death at 80, some three years later, is not pictured.

The polychromatic effects of gardens in bloom, cloud formations and seasonal changes are spectacular. The naturally soft, pastel shades caught are truly beautiful and compare to color films produced in the U.S. at the time.

The score by Shostakovich and the English titles are unobstrusive and helpful. Grigori Belov, looking remarkably like photographs of the scientist, makes, except for declamatory lapses, a wholly plausible Michurin, harassed and misunderstood by fellow scientists and officialdom. Alexandra Vassilieva, as his wife and associate researcher, and Feoder Grigoriev, as an unbelieving geneticist, contribute the major supporting roles in what is, to all purposes, a one-man show. It is not too much of a show for those not interested in Michurin.


June 18, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Taras Shevchenko
Directed by Petro Chardynin
Biography
1926, VUFKU, Ukraine, B&W
Silent; Rus/Eng intertitles, & Ukr
Music: Oleksandr Saratskyi, 2012

The first Ukrainian biopic and the first film about Shevchenko's life that determined the canons for visual representation of the poet's biography before the film release of the same name by Igor Savchenko in 1951. At the time, the 1926 original silent was one of the most expensive shoots in Ukrainian Soviet filmmaking: specialists in history, ethnography, literature criticism and etc. were involved for the first time during the preparation for filming. Vasil Krychevsky, the famous modernist artist, created the artistic film design; Sergiy Efremov was a consultant for the film; and Amvrosiy Buchma brilliantly played the role of Taras Shevchenko.

It is interesting that the first third of the film, "Little Taras," which was significantly influenced by Margarita Barska-Chardynina, Chardynin's wife, the founder of Soviet children's film genre, was shown as a separate children's film.

Although "Taras Shevchenko" was the greatest Ukrainian professional achievement of director Petr Chardynin, the critics gave it an ambiguous reception. The film was criticized for the absence of a firm context, a story that lacked cause-and-effect linkages, and made simply as a chronology of Shevchenko's life events. The film critics of 1920's were not prepared to appraise such and usual new film genre, which relies on memories and citations to develop the narrative.

Nevertheless, composed from a number of short novels illustrating Shevchenko's life as a young man, soldier, and poet, the film "Taras Shevchenko" was screened triumphantly in Ukraine and other countries, and it became the most successful film project of Ukraine in 1926.


June 15, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

The Soviet Story
Directed by Edvins Snore
2008, 85 min.
English

In what ways were the propaganda of the Nazi and the Soviet regimes similar? How was 20th century Ukraine affected by these two superpowers? See the connections in The Soviet Story, Latvian film director Edvins Snore's 2008 award-winning documentary. The Economist called the film "gripping, audacious, and uncompromising—the most powerful antidote yet to the sanitisation of the past."

Wikipedia: The Soviet Story is a 2008 documentary film about Soviet Communism and Soviet–German collaboration before 1941 written and directed by Edvins Snore and sponsored by the UEN Group in the European Parliament.

The film features interviews with western and Russian historians such as Norman Davies and Boris Sokolov, Russian writer Viktor Suvorov, Soviet dissident Vladimir Bukovsky, members of the European Parliament and the participants, as well as the victims of Soviet terror.

The film argues that there were close philosophical, political and organizational connections between the Nazi and Soviet systems before and during the early stages of World War II.[1] It highlights the Great Purge as well as the Great Famine, Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, Katyn massacre, Gestapo-NKVD collaboration, Soviet mass deportations and medical experiments in the GULAG.


June 13, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Love’s Berry (Yahidka kokhannia)
Directed by Alexander Dovzhenko
Cinematography: Danylo Demutsky
Comedy
1926, 30 min., VUFKU
Silent, Rus & Eng intertitles
Courtesy of the National Oleksandr Dovzhenko Centre in Ukraine.

Betraying the director's beginnings as a newspaper cartoonist, Dovzhenko's debut film "Love's Berry" is a farce that combines hyperkinetic proceedings a la Harold Clayton Lloyd (silent comedy actor) with satirical sketches of the NEP generation (i.e., Lenin's "liberal" New Economic Policy), the beneficiaries of an early Soviet attempt at mixing capitalist elements with socialism that resulted in a short-lived Soviet bourgeoisie. The plot involves a dandified barber's attempts to get rid of the titular "love berry" (i.e. his illegitimate offspring); even today, its ultra-permissive sexual politics force one to take notice. -- SeagullFilms.com

PLOT
The paramour of playboy Jean Kovbasiuk hints that the baby she's holding is the "fruit of their love" (love's berry). When she abandons the child in his possesion, Jean first tries to find ways to lose the bundle of joy, but when faced with a battle in court, he frantically searches for it. After marrying his mistress in order to legitimize the child, he discovers too late that the child was neither his nor his paramour's.


June 12, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Two Days (Dva Dni)
Ukraine, VUFKU, 1927, 60 min
© State Film Agency of Ukraine, digital restoration
Directed by HEORHII STAVOBYI
Cinematography by DANYLO DEMUTSKY
Music by BORYS LATOSHYNSKY (1932), YURII MYKHALCHUK (2011)
B&W, silent
Ukrainian intertitles, English subtitles
Courtesy of the National Oleksandr Dovzhenko Centre in Ukraine.

A wealthy family flees Odesa leaving the estate behind in the hands of their faithful caretaker as the Red (Bolshevik) Army advances, then the White Army returns and a tragedy ensues. Politics and family drama are highlighted by the exceptional cinematography by Demutsky and direction by Stabovyi. Note the 1920s sets and costumes.


June 11, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

The Diplomatic Pouch
Original title: Sumka dipkuriera
Ukrainian release title: Teka dypkuriera
Directed by Aleksander (Oleksander) Dovzhenko
VUFKU (Vseukrainske fotokinoupravlinnia), Odesa, 1927
Feature narrative
60 mins.
Black & white
Silent w/Russian intertitles, English subtitles

Diplomatic Pouch is an amusing international spy thriller involving villainous British diplomats scheming against their virtuous Soviet counterparts.

Shipmates on the British steamer "Victoria" help to safely transport a Russian communique that the British secret service attempt to snatch. Dovzhenko himself appears in the film as the ship's stoker (stoking the boiler on a coal-powered steam ship).


June 6, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

The Soviet Story
Directed by Edvins Snore
2008, 85 min.
English

In what ways were the propaganda of the Nazi and the Soviet regimes similar? How was 20th century Ukraine affected by these two superpowers? See the connections in The Soviet Story, Latvian film director Edvins Snore's 2008 award-winning documentary. The Economist called the film "gripping, audacious, and uncompromising—the most powerful antidote yet to the sanitisation of the past."

Wikipedia: The Soviet Story is a 2008 documentary film about Soviet Communism and Soviet–German collaboration before 1941 written and directed by Edvins Snore and sponsored by the UEN Group in the European Parliament.

The film features interviews with western and Russian historians such as Norman Davies and Boris Sokolov, Russian writer Viktor Suvorov, Soviet dissident Vladimir Bukovsky, members of the European Parliament and the participants, as well as the victims of Soviet terror.

The film argues that there were close philosophical, political and organizational connections between the Nazi and Soviet systems before and during the early stages of World War II.[1] It highlights the Great Purge as well as the Great Famine, Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, Katyn massacre, Gestapo-NKVD collaboration, Soviet mass deportations and medical experiments in the GULAG.


June 5, 2014
Matinée at the Museum at 3 pm

Music Partisans (Muzyczna Partyzantka)
Director: Miroslaw Dembinski
Documentary
2007, 52 min., Film Studio Everest
Belarusian, Eng subtitles

This documentary by the award-winning director of "A Lesson of Belorussian" presents young rockmusic bands that are opposed to President Lukashenka's regime.

There is a monument of Lenin in every town in Belarus; you can find the old communist hammer and sickle on every street. The powerful symbol is on sugar packets in cafés and is even stamped on eggs. Through this country full of absurd Soviet relics, a number of young musicians go on tour. Through their contemporary music they try to touch on age-old problems in Belarus. The film follows them through the everyday struggle of "colorful" musicians against a "grey" background.

The main character is Svieta, a 20- year-old rock singer. Svieta is very passionate, believing that Belarus will one day be free. Lavor Volski, 10 years older than Svieta is more sceptical. He is the leader of the most popular rock band in Belarus called NRM (Independent Republic of Dreams / ?????????? ?????????? ????). They express their attitude to the surrounding reality trough their music, clothes and behavior.

Dembinski interlaces interviews with these underground rebels and their protest songs with poignant archive images of the militia that heavy-handedly stops protest events. The film concludes with the elections of 2006 that, as was expected, ended in a victory for Lukashenko. Thousands of demonstrators, including the musicians, gather at October Square, but after a few days they are arrested with force. In jail, however, they will not let them take away their ideals; here, the protest songs simply continue.

"If you're afraid, nothing ever changes."

MIROSLAW DEMBINSKI
Born 1959 in Bydgoszcz. Graduated in Mathematics at the Kopernik University in Torun. Graduated in Film Directing from the Lodz Film School (1990). Documentary Directing teacher since 1990. Directed almost 30 films, series, documentaries; received nearly 80 international film festivals prizes. In 1991 he started activity as an independent producer establishing the Everest Film Studio, where he produced nearly 50 short films (mostly documentary) which were awarded 49 times at international film festivals and were broadcasted on numerous European TV stations. His feature credits include "The Call Room 107" (Pokoj 107, 1997), (Wezwanie, 1996), "Taranthriller" (1993) while this best known doc films are "Belarusian Lesson" (Lekcja bialoruskiego, 2006) "Dwarfs Go to Ukraine" (Krasnoludki jada na Ukraine, 2005), "Loosers And Winners" (Przegrani i zwyciezcy, 2004)


May 16, 2014 at 7 pm
and
The Winter That Changed Us

with
Volodymyr Tykhyy, Director
Yuri Gruzinov, camera operator

4 #Babylon'13 films (Ukrainian w/English subtitles):
Mezhyhiria. Batina Xata ("Mezhyhiria. Daddy's Cottage" – the mansion of former president Viktor Yanukovych), 20 min.
Kokteyly Hrushevskoho ("Hrushevshky cocktails" – the battle on Hrushevsky Street with molotov cocktails as weapons), 28 mins.
Pozhezha u Budynku Profspilok ("Fire in the Trade Union Building"), 21 mins.
Nebesna Sotnia ("The Celestial Hundred" – video memorializes the victims of the battle on Kyiv's Maidan), 4.5 mins.

The Babylon ’13 team of filmmakers put their lives on the line every day in Ukraine as they work to capture on film the essence of the changes that have occurred in Ukraine from the late November 2013 protests in Kyiv to the expanded conflict that has reached into many regions of Ukraine. Two of the team members are here to tell their stories.

We met filmmaker and project director Volodymyr Tykhyy in 2012 when he was at the Museum to show his successful short film series "Goodbye, Ukraine!" as part of the KinofestNYC.com film festival. Back in New York City again to participate in this year’s festival (with the support of the Ukrainian arts organization, Izolyatsia.org), Tykhyy brings to the Museum a set of short documentaries from the award-winning Babylon ’13 series, a continuing story about the crisis in Ukraine.

Cameraman Yuri Gruzinov was wounded during the brutal attack by the Berkut forces. He was treated alongside a Maidan activist – Serhiy Nihoyan, the ethnic Armenian who would be the first Maidan victim to die of his wounds. Later, while on assignment in Crimea, Yuri was detained and beaten again. Suspected of being a member of the "Right Sector" Maidan protesters, he was finally released after six days.

See their gripping video footage and incisive interviews, and hear their personal testimony about the events they witnessed as Ukraine’s crisis unfolded before them.

Q&A and a light reception will follow the screening.

Admission (includes reception and gallery access): $10. Tickets available at the door one hour before showtime.


May 2, 2014 at 7:30 pm
and
May 4, 2014 at 4 pm
February 18th, a Day in the Battle for Maidan

with filmmaker Damian Kolodiy

February 18th, a Day in the Battle for Maidan is excerpted footage from Damian Kolodiy's work-in-progress documentary film (tentatively titled Freedom or Death: A Revolution of Dignity) on the revolutionary events that took place in Kyiv, Ukraine, this year. This special screening is a rough cut edit consisting of a compilation of footage from over 10 different cameras of scenes chronicling the day's events starting with the demonstration at the Ukrainian Parliament in the morning, followed by the attack and dispersal of demonstrators in Mariyinsky Park, and culminating with the burning of Maidan and the standoff between the government forces and Maidan demonstrators. Also featured in the footage is Mezhyhiria, Yanukovych's secret home and hunting cabin, filmed on the first day the public was permitted to enter and tour the property.

Filmed in Ukrainian and Russian; introduction and commentaries by the filmmaker in English, followed by Q&A.

Warning: Contains graphic combat footage.

Admission (includes reception and gallery access): $10. Tickets available at the door one hour before showtime.


April 5, 2014
I Am a Ukrainian and A Whisper to a Roar

In person! Yulia Marushevska, the EuroMaidan Activist in the Video, and filmmaker Ben Moses

Meet Yulia Marushevska, the Taras Shevchenko University student in Kyiv, Ukraine, and EuroMaidan activist, who captivated the world in the video titled I Am a Ukrainian that went viral overnight. Filmmaker Ben Moses will present the video and his film A Whisper to a Roar (2012) about courageous democracy activists in five countries (Egypt, Malaysia, Ukraine, Venezuela and Zimbabwe), who risk it all to bring freedom to their people.

Admission (includes reception and gallery access): $15; $10 members, seniors; $5 students.

VIDEO: I Am a Ukrainian

A Whisper to a Roar on Wikipedia


March/April/May 2014
PYSANKA: The Ukrainian Easter Egg

Screened with each adult pysanka workshop, during pysanka demonstrations by artists, school pysanka workshops, and in 2014 shown continuously April 12 – May 11 in conjunction with the exhibition Pysanka: the Ukrainian Easter Egg.
Directed by Slavko Nowytski
USA, 1976, 2006
Internationally acclaimed 14 minute film by Slavko Nowytski featuring pysanka artist Luba Perchyshyn. Artistically shows the decorating process of Ukrainian Easter Eggs while explaining historic and spiritual background.


Print the flyer

February 9, 2014
"Stories from Maidan" Short Film Screening

The Ukrainian Museum is sponsoring this «Razom» "flash film" screening. Curated by filmmaker Damian Kolodiy (The Orange Chronicles), the line-up includes art film shorts produced in Ukraine and a variety of news videos telling the story of EuroMaidan.

Roster of short films screened:
1. People of Euro-Maidan, video by Max Zabolotnyi
2. Ukrainian Police forcefully disperse people on Maidan (news clip compiliation)
3. Without Leaders, a #Babylon'13 film
4. Vice: Ukraine Rising Parts 1 and 2
5. The Donetsk March, a #Babylon'13 film
6. The Price of Democracy, by Natalia Bartosik
7. What is Wrong in Ukraine?!, a viral video
     One angry and frustrated protester, Alexander Kulabuhov, decided to record a message in English to explain "to Europe and America" why Ukrainians are demonstrating.
8. Ukraine needs a Hero, video by Petro Mohyla for the group "Typichnyi Kyiv"
9. Auto-Maidan & the police
10. Medic is shot in leg (news footage)
11. TV Den, Hrushevskoho No Comments
12. In Hell, a #Babylon'13 film
13. 4 Deaths Tonight
14. Honor the dead (Personal)
15. How the Maidan Self defense Organizes, a Zhyvi Novyny release
16. Markty Who is on Maidan?
17. Charlie Chaplin's famous "Exhortation Speech" from The Great Dictator by Volodymyr Hulidov (UK)


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